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  • While you weren't sleeping: In face of impeachment, Trump pursues agenda on courts, environment, Israel and more

    While you weren't sleeping: In face of impeachment, Trump pursues agenda on courts, environment, Israel and moreThe work of the Trump administration continues on a variety of fronts, largely overshadowed by the high drama of a president accused of high crimes and misdemeanors.


  • Bolivia in crisis after ‘coup’ against president

    Bolivia in crisis after ‘coup’ against presidentEvo Morales, who had been president of Bolivia for 14 years, resigned last week amid allegations he fixed an election. In his absence, the country is teetering on the brink of violence and authoritarianism.


  • US woman could be forced to register as a sex offender after appearing topless in front of step-children

    US woman could be forced to register as a sex offender after appearing topless in front of step-childrenAn American woman could be forced to register as a sex offender after appearing topless in front of her step-children in her own home. Tilli Buchanan, from Utah, was charged with three counts of misdemeanour lewdness involving a child after appearing topless along with the children's father in their home last year. Ms Buchanan's lawyers are contesting the charge, arguing it is unfair to treat men and women differently for baring her chest. She said she and her husband were working in their garage in late 2017 or early 2018 and removed their shirts to prevent them from getting dusty.   She told the court that when the children, aged nine and 13, entered the garage she “explained she considers herself a feminist and wanted to make a point that everybody should be fine with walking around their house or elsewhere with skin showing”. “It was in the privacy of my own home. My husband was right next to me in the same exact manner that I was, and he’s not being prosecuted,” she said after the court hearing. The charge occurred after child welfare officials began an investigation involving the children on an unrelated matter and the children’s mother reported the incident to authorities because she was “alarmed.” If convicted, Ms Buchanan could be required to register as a sex offender for 10 years. Her husband was not charged. Ms Buchanan's lawyers appeared in court on Tuesday to ask a judge to overturn the charges, arguing that they are unconstitutional. The lawyers cited a previous court ruling that overturned a Colorado ban on women going topless in public. However the prosecution said that in the US, nudity is commonly understood to include women's breasts. The judge in the case, Kara Pettit, declined to rule immediately on the case, saying it was “too important of an issue”. A ruling is expected in the next few months.


  • Gabbard and Harris clash over visions for the Democratic Party

    Gabbard and Harris clash over visions for the Democratic PartyAt the Democratic debate in Atlanta on Wednesday, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and Sen. Kamala Harris of California clashed over their differing visions for the party, particularly when it comes to foreign policy.


  • Military: 2 airmen killed in crash during Oklahoma training

    Military: 2 airmen killed in crash during Oklahoma trainingTwo airmen were killed Thursday in an accident involving two jets during the landing phase of a training exercise at a U.S. Air Force base in northwestern Oklahoma, a military official said. The crash occurred shortly after 9 a.m. at Vance Air Force Base in Enid, about 65 miles (105 kilometers) northwest of Oklahoma City. Two airmen aboard one of the T-38 Talons were killed, Col. Corey Simmons, commander of the 71st Flying Training Wing, said during a news conference Thursday afternoon.


  • American Airlines admitted a mid-air accident that knocked out 2 flight crew and forced an emergency landing was not caused by spilled soap

    American Airlines admitted a mid-air accident that knocked out 2 flight crew and forced an emergency landing was not caused by spilled soapOn October 21 a flight from London to Philadelphia was forced to land in Dublin, Ireland, when two staff members were knocked unconscious.


  • Russia 'ruined' Ukrainian naval vessels before handing them back, says Ukrainian navy

    Russia 'ruined' Ukrainian naval vessels before handing them back, says Ukrainian navyThree Ukrainian navy boats seized by Russia a year ago were vandalised before being handed back to Ukraine, the country's navy said.  The fast gunboats Nikopol and Berdyansk and the tugboat Tany Kapu were welcomed by Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskiy and onlookers waving national flags arrived in Ochakiv, a Ukrainian naval port on the Black Sea on Wednesday evening.  But Ukraine's navy said the vessels had been stripped bare and left so badly damaged that they had to be towed home by tug. "The Russians ruined them," said Admiral Ihor Voronchenko, the head of the Ukrainian Navy.   "They even took the ceiling lights, plug sockets, and lavatories," he said.  Mr Zelenskiy, who reviewed the vessels as they returned on Thursday morning, said: "I am very happy that our navy vessels are back where they belong. As promised, we have brought back our sailors and our ships.   "Some of the equipment is missing, as well as some weapons. There will be an investigation. We will see all of the details."   Russia blocked the Kerch strait with a tanker and deployed fighter jets to stop the three vessels entering the Azov Sea last year Credit: Pavel Rebrov/Reuters Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), which oversees the border service that seized the vessels, denied tampering with the ships and said they had been "handed over to the Ukrainian side in normal condition."   The three vessels were boarded by Russian forces after they tried to pass through the Strait of Kerch in November last year.  Russia says they illegally violated the Russian border, then impounded the vessels and jailed 24 crew members pending trial.  Ukraine described the move as an act of war and a flagrant breach of the treaty that gives the countries joint sovereignty of the only channel between the Black and Azov seas.  Mr Zelenskiy said the return of the boats as the latest in a series of small steps "towards peace" ahead of a key summit with Vladimir Putin next month.  Mr Zelenskiy inspects the artillery boat Nikopol Credit: Arkhip Vereshchagin/TASS The two presidents will meet in person for the first time in Paris on December 9, at talks brokered by France and Germany that are designed to end the conflict in east Ukraine, which has killed 13,000 people since 2014.     In September the ships' crews were released in a prisoner swap that also saw Russia free Oleg Sentsov, a Ukrainian filmmaker and activist who had been held on trumped-up charges since the annexation of Crimea in 2014.    The sides have also agreed to pull back troops from key points on the line of contact in eastern Ukraine. The narrow sea way between Crimea and Russia's Taman peninsula is the only passage for ships sailing to and from Ukraine's industrial port of Mariupol, to which the flotilla was bound when it was seized.  Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine in 2014 and opened a bridge across the strait in 2017 in defiance of Ukrainian objections. Mariupol is a few miles from the frontline where Ukrainian and Russian-directed separatist forces have been fighting a static war for five years.


  • Rep. Devin Nunes got help from indicted Giuliani associate Lev Parnas for 2018 Europe trip

    Rep. Devin Nunes got help from indicted Giuliani associate Lev Parnas for 2018 Europe tripRep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) traveled to Europe with three aides from Nov. 30 to Dec. 3, 2018, on a $63,000 taxpayer-funded investigative trip, and Lev Parnas, an associate of Rudy Giuliani arrested last month on federal campaign finance and conspiracy charges, helped arrange meetings and calls for his trip, The Daily Beast reports, citing Parnas lawyer Ed MacMahaon and congressional records. Nunes aide Derek Harvey was involved in the Parnas meeting, and he accompanied Nunes to Europe along with fellow aides Scott Glabe and George Pappas.At the time of the trip, Nunes was outgoing chairman of the House Intelligence Committee -- he is now the committee's top Republican and lead voice in the public impeachment hearings. Nunes was visiting Europe as part of his investigation into the origins of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Russia and President Trump's campaign. During the period Nunes was in Europe, Giuliani was in the middle of his ultimately successful campaign to oust U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Maria Yovanovitch, a plot Parnas and partner Igor Fruman were also involved in, according to the federal indictment.Parnas "believed that what he was doing was furtherance of the president's and thus our national interests," said Joseph Bondy, a member of Parnas' legal team. "President Trump's recent and regrettable disavowal of Mr. Parnas has caused him to rethink his involvement and the true reasons for his having been recruited to participate in the President's activities. Mr. Parnas is prepared to testify completely and accurately about his involvement in the President and Rudy Giuliani's quid pro quo demands of Ukraine." Read more at The Daily Beast.More stories from theweek.com Republicans are throwing Rudy Giuliani under the bus Over 5 months in 2017, the Secret Service spent more than $250,000 at Trump properties Outed CIA agent Valerie Plame is running for Congress, and her launch video looks like a spy movie trailer


  • Ohio abortion law would require doctors to attempt impossible procedure of re-implanting ectopic pregnancies in uterus

    Ohio abortion law would require doctors to attempt impossible procedure of re-implanting ectopic pregnancies in uterusAnti-abortion politicians in Ohio want doctors to attempt to re-implant ectopic pregnancies – a procedure derided by one doctor as “pure science fiction”.Members of the state’s Republican Party proposed a law this month that would force physicians to attempt an operation for which experts say technology does not currently exist.


  • House Democrats ponder expanding impeachment probe after Sondland 'game changer' testimony

    House Democrats ponder expanding impeachment probe after Sondland 'game changer' testimonyGordon Sondland’s explosive testimony Wednesday that “everyone was in the loop” on President Trump’s efforts to secure an investigation of a political rival prompted rank-and-file Democrats to discuss whether it was time to expand their probe.


  • Pot stocks soar as U.S. House committee clears bill on federal weed legalization

    Pot stocks soar as U.S. House committee clears bill on federal weed legalizationThe bill, which was passed 24 to 10 in the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, sent shares of Canopy Growth , Aurora Cannabis , Aphria Inc and Tilray Inc up between 8% and 15%. "We think federal legalization would be a big positive for investor sentiment surrounding cannabis equities, which have been battered by oversupply and a steep price decline for the underlying commodity since becoming legal in Canada," said Garrett Nelson, senior equity analyst at CFRA Research.


  • Police shoot man who was 'extremely irate' on tarmac of Las Vegas airport

    Police shoot man who was 'extremely irate' on tarmac of Las Vegas airportAs a struggle with an irate suspect unfolded on a tarmac between A and B gates at Terminal 1, an officer fired two rounds and struck the man.


  • Israeli air strikes kill 23 in Syria: monitor

    Israeli air strikes kill 23 in Syria: monitorIsrael said its warplanes carried out a "very intense" attack against Iranian forces and Syrian army targets in Syria Wednesday, in raids a monitoring group reported killed at least 23 people. In a rare confirmation of their operations in Syria, the Israeli army said they had carried out dozens of strikes against the Iranian elite Quds Force and the Syrian military, in response to four rockets fired at Israel a day before.


  • 20 of the Most Beautiful Bridges in the World

    20 of the Most Beautiful Bridges in the World


  • Nearly ¾ of transgender people slain since 2017 killed with guns

    Nearly ¾ of transgender people slain since 2017 killed with guns"Transgender violence is a gun violence issue," says Everytown for Gun Safety researcher


  • Mayor of St. Louis suburb charged in election fraud case

    Mayor of St. Louis suburb charged in election fraud caseThe 81-year-old mayor of a St. Louis suburb was charged Thursday with submitting fraudulent absentee voter applications in what prosecutors say was an effort to illegally influence the city’s municipal elections. Berkeley Mayor Theodore Hoskins is charged with four counts of committing an election offense and one forgery count. The charges were filed by Jackson County prosecutor Jean Peters Baker, who was assigned to the case as special prosecutor at the request of St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell to avoid the appearance of conflict of interest.


  • Obama Warns Technology Has Created a More Splintered World

    Obama Warns Technology Has Created a More Splintered World(Bloomberg) -- Former U.S. President Barack Obama warned that technology is creating a more splintered world, fueling the disparities among wealthy and poorer nations, and people within countries.“The rise of extreme inequality both within nations and between nations that is being turbocharged by globalization and technology” is one of the biggest risks for young people, Obama said Thursday at Salesforce.com Inc.’s annual Dreamforce conference in San Francisco. “New technologies have allowed us reach. We have a global market. I can project my voice and you can take your technology to new markets. It has also amplified inequalities.”Though his successor Donald Trump has taken presidential use of Twitter to new heights, Obama has long been associated with the tech industry. His 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns were known for their use of the internet and social media to galvanize supporters. Some of Obama’s staffers came from Silicon Valley companies, including Alphabet Inc.’s Google, and there’s a diaspora of former Obama administration officials who have worked in the tech industry since leaving the White House, including David Plouffe, formerly with Uber Technologies Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.’s top spokesman Jay Carney.Still, the 44th president talked about how the internet has helped divide American politics and society.“People remark on the polarization of our politics and rightfully so,” Obama said. “People rightfully see challenges like climate change and mass refugees and feel like things are spinning out of control. Behind that, what I see is a sense of anxiety, rootlessness and uncertainty in so many people. Some of that is fed by technology and there’s an anger formed by those technologies.”Social-media services including Facebook Inc. and Google‘s YouTube have been accused of fueling polarization with algorithms that show people news and other content that match their preconceived thinking and viewpoints.“If you watch Fox News, you live in a different reality than if you read the New York Times. If you follow one rabbit hole on YouTube or the internet, then suddenly things look completely different,” Obama said during his conversation with Salesforce co-Chief Executive Officer Marc Benioff. “We are siloing ourselves off in ways that are dangerous. I believed, and I still believe the internet can be a powerful tool for us to finally see each other and unify us, but right now it’s disappointing.”Since leaving the White House in January 2017, Obama has become a fixture on the paid-speaker circuit. Thursday’s appearance at Dreamforce is at least Obama’s second appearance at a tech event in San Francisco in the last two months. He also spoke at a Splunk Inc. conference in September.To contact the reporter on this story: Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • American Airlines admits a midair accident that knocked out 2 flight crew was not caused by spilled soap

    American Airlines admits a midair accident that knocked out 2 flight crew was not caused by spilled soapAmerican Airlines admitted Tuesday the powerful fumes that knocked two flight attendants unconscious and forced a flight to make an emergency landing were not caused by spilled soap, as the airline had previously claimed.


  • GOP claim that Trump cares about corruption takes a hit at impeachment hearing

    GOP claim that Trump cares about corruption takes a hit at impeachment hearingRep. Jim Himes, D-Conn., took issue with a defense of President Trump floated by Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas.


  • Sondland pressed on why Trump has blocked witnesses: 'I wish I could answer'

    Sondland pressed on why Trump has blocked witnesses: 'I wish I could answer'Rep. Denny Heck, D-Wash., took aim at the members of the Trump administration who have refused to testify in the impeachment inquiry.


  • Google's Tour Builder Is a Great New Way to Make Your Friends Hate You

    Google's Tour Builder Is a Great New Way to Make Your Friends Hate You


  • Mexicans sue Walmart over Texas shooting that left victims on both sides of border

    Mexicans sue Walmart over Texas shooting that left victims on both sides of borderTen Mexican citizens have sued Walmart over the shooting at a store in the U.S. border town of El Paso, Texas, that killed eight Mexicans and left eight more injured, saying that Walmart did not do enough to protect its customers, Mexico said on Wednesday. The suspected gunman told police he was targeting "Mexicans" in the August shooting, which killed 22 people in total.


  • Colorado's Mesa County Valley School District 51 is closing all its schools amid 'unprecedented' illness outbreak

    Colorado's Mesa County Valley School District 51 is closing all its schools amid 'unprecedented' illness outbreakMesa County Valley School District 51 is closing all of its schools until after Thanksgiving break because of an illness outbreak.


  • Fearful wait for justice a decade after Philippine massacre

    Fearful wait for justice a decade after Philippine massacreA decade after 58 people were killed in the Philippines' worst political massacre, none of the alleged masterminds have been convicted yet, leaving families fearful that justice may never come. "We are afraid for the life of the prosecutor or even our judge," said Mary Grace Morales, whose sister and husband were among 32 journalists killed in the attack, making it one of world's deadliest on media workers. Ampatuan family leaders, who ruled the impoverished southern province of Maguindanao, are charged with organising the mass killing in a bid to quash an election challenge from a rival clan.


  • Yes, America Is Using Stealth Drones to Spy on Iran

    Yes, America Is Using Stealth Drones to Spy on IranIt is very likely.


  • Delisting Chinese Firms From U.S. Is a ‘Terrible Idea,’ Hank Paulson Says

    Delisting Chinese Firms From U.S. Is a ‘Terrible Idea,’ Hank Paulson Says(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson said calls to oust Chinese companies from American stock indexes was contrary to the foundations of capitalism, as he warned against the dangers of decoupling the world’s two largest economies.Paulson, who’s now chairman of the Paulson Institute, told Bloomberg’s New Economy Forum in Beijing that moves to reduce ties between the U.S. and China would weaken American leadership and New York’s leading role in finance. He said less cooperation between Washington and Beijing would also make it more difficult to tackle another financial crisis like the one he was forced to manage as treasury secretary in 2008.“When the next crisis comes -- and a crisis will come, because financial crises are inevitable -- we will regret it if we lack mechanisms for the world’s first and second-largest economies to coordinate,” Paulson told the forum on Thursday, according to a prepared version of his remarks.Paulson’s speech followed on from his warning at the same forum last year that an “economic iron curtain” was descending between the U.S. and Chinese economies. Since then, the relations between the two sides have grown even more strained by trade disputes, security spats and disagreement over human rights.The Trump administration has been pressuring allies to stop using Chinese technology. U.S. officials are also discussing ways to limit American investors’ portfolio flows into China, Bloomberg News reported in September, citing people familiar with the internal deliberations.The U.S. Treasury said that there was no plan “at this time” to block Chinese companies from listing on U.S. stock exchanges.“Decoupling China from U.S. markets by delisting Chinese firms from US exchanges is a terrible idea,” Paulson said. “So is forcing Chinese equities out of the MSCI indexes. It is simply contrary to the foundations of successful capitalism for politicians and bureaucrats to instruct private American players how to deploy private capital for private ends.”The New Economy Forum is being organized by Bloomberg Media Group, a division of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.\--With assistance from Karen Leigh.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Peter Martin in Beijing at pmartin138@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, James MaygerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


  • President Andrew Yang's first words to Russia's Vladimir Putin: 'I'm sorry I beat your guy'

    President Andrew Yang's first words to Russia's Vladimir Putin: 'I'm sorry I beat your guy'Andrew Yang didn't get much speaking time at Wednesday night's Democratic presidential debate in Atlanta, but he made memorable use of the time he got. Near the end of the debate, Yang was asked what he would say, if elected, in his first call with Russian President Vladimir Putin. "Well, first I'd say I'm sorry I beat your guy," he said. "Or not sorry," he added, after a pause for applause. "And second, I'd say the days of meddling in American elections are over, and we will take any undermining of our democratic processes as an act of hostility and aggression."Yang continued with a substantive answer, though he got a little in the weeds of mixed metaphors with his proposal for a "new World Data Organization, like a WTO for data, because right now, unfortunately, we're living in a world where data is the new oil and we don't have our arms around it."More stories from theweek.com Republicans are throwing Rudy Giuliani under the bus Over 5 months in 2017, the Secret Service spent more than $250,000 at Trump properties Outed CIA agent Valerie Plame is running for Congress, and her launch video looks like a spy movie trailer


  • Trump lashes out at Fox News for interviewing Democrat

    Trump lashes out at Fox News for interviewing DemocratDonald Trump has lashed out at Fox News for interviewing a Democratic politician.The president singled out one of the channel’s female presenters during a furious Twitter rant, in which he proclaimed his innocence in the face of damaging testimony by his EU ambassador in Wednesday’s impeachment hearings.


  • Reeling progressives meet behind closed doors after 'Medicare for All' barrage

    Reeling progressives meet behind closed doors after 'Medicare for All' barrage"Medicare for All" has taken a beating lately. Its two biggest proponents in the presidential field, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, have come under sustained attack from centrist Democrats over the issue. The health care industry is spending millions to sow opposition.


  • Soldier who shot Lebanese protester dead charged with murder

    Soldier who shot Lebanese protester dead charged with murderA Lebanese soldier who shot and killed a protester in Beirut last week was charged Thursday by a military prosecutor with murder, state-run National News Agency said. Alaa Abu Fakhr, 38, was shot dead Nov. 12 by the soldier, who was trying to open a road closed by protesters in southern Beirut, marking the first death since widespread protests against Lebanon’s ruling elite began Oct. 17. Protesters demand all those politicians go, blaming them for decades of systematic corruption that has left the Mediterranean country on the brink of economic and financial disaster.


  • Laura Loomer’s ‘Nonsensical’ Lawsuit Killed by Judge

    Laura Loomer’s ‘Nonsensical’ Lawsuit Killed by JudgeStephanie Keith/GettyFar-right conspiracy theorist Laura Loomer lost a lawsuit against a Muslim-rights organization this week after a judge ruled that her entire case was “to put it mildly, nonsensical.”Loomer was a prominent anti-Muslim internet personality until she was banned from most major social media platforms beginning last year. Since then, she has launched a congressional bid, which she acknowledged in a campaign email was at least partially a ploy to have her social media accounts restored. She also filed a lawsuit against the Council on American-Islamic Relations earlier this year, accusing the civil rights group of plotting to take down her Twitter account.Many of her claims in that lawsuit originated from a prank by leftist Twitter users who quickly confessed to the stunt. That didn’t stop Loomer from pursuing the lawsuit to its doomed end on Wednesday.Twitter banned Loomer in November 2018, after years of anti-Muslim posts. (She is also banned from Uber, Lyft, Venmo, GoFundMe, PayPal, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and other platforms for similar infractions.) But Loomer, who has promoted a number of conspiracy theories (she made her first headlines attempting to accuse her university of supporting ISIS) soon latched onto an elaborate explanation for her ban.Republican Lawmakers on Being Photographed With Laura Loomer: We Don’t Know HerShe tried to overturn the ban by handcuffing herself to the door of Twitter’s New York City offices. Twitter remained unmoved, but the stunt attracted the attention of Twitter users Nathan Bernard and Chris Gillen, who decided to pose as Twitter employees, Right Wing Watch first reported. Beginning in December, the pair sent Loomer messages claiming Twitter had met with CAIR representatives shortly before her ban.The pair said Loomer did not seek to authenticate any of their claims, including a ridiculous forged calendar they sent her, which appeared to show Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey scheduling two-and-a-half consecutive hours of meditation time every work day. “We couldn’t have done it dumber,” Gillen told Right Wing Watch in January. “We couldn’t have been less careful. It’s so obviously bullshit.”The pranksters also shared audio of a phone call in which Loomer accused Dorsey of “taking money from all these Muslims and implementing Sharia law.”Loomer passed the allegation to the Wall Street Journal, which implied that CAIR was among “outside groups and individuals [that] had privately lobbied Twitter executives to remove her from the site in late November.” A series of right-wing news sites picked up the story, accusing CAIR and Twitter of conspiring against Loomer.Although Bernard and Gillen came clean about the stunt in January, Loomer continued to press the conspiracy theory in court. In April, she filed suit against CAIR, accusing it of “tortious interference with an advantageous business relationship” between herself and Twitter.Anti-Muslim Activist Laura Loomer to Run for CongressThat argument had a fatal flaw: Loomer had no business relationship with Twitter, a judge ruled on Wednesday.“[E]ven accepting as true Plaintiffs’ proposition that Defendant reported Loomer’s account and convinced Twitter to ban Loomer, doing so does not create a cause of action for tortious interference with a business relationship,” the judge wrote in a dismissal. “Plaintiffs’ suggestion that the mere reporting of a Twitter user—however insistent such reporting may be—is sufficient to constitute tortious interference in a business relationship between Twitter and the targeted user is, to put it mildly, nonsensical.”In other words, tweeting isn’t a job, and getting banned isn’t the same as getting fired.If Loomer wants to find the culprit behind her ban, she can look in the mirror, CAIR said after the Wednesday dismissal.“We are pleased the court recognized that Loomer’s complaint against CAIR was baseless,” CAIR National Litigation Director Lena Masri said in a statement. “Her own pattern of anti-Muslim rhetoric is what caused Twitter and at least eight other internet platforms to ban her, not any actions by CAIR.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • 'Don't let them in': Arrests made as hundreds protest Ann Coulter speech at UC Berkeley

    'Don't let them in': Arrests made as hundreds protest Ann Coulter speech at UC BerkeleyCoulter was invited to the California university by the Berkeley College Republicans for a speech about immigration called 'Adios, America.'


  • Pompeo planning to resign over Trump, report claims

    Pompeo planning to resign over Trump, report claimsSecretary of State Mike Pompeo has reportedly told three prominent Republicans that he is planning to resign from the White House to run for a Senate seat.


  • Teen in California high school shooting rampage used 'ghost gun' made from parts

    Teen in California high school shooting rampage used 'ghost gun' made from partsA 16-year-old boy who opened fire at his Southern California high school, killing two classmates and wounding three others before shooting himself in the head, used a "ghost gun" built from parts, the local sheriff said on Thursday. Nathaniel Tennosuke Berhow pulled the .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol from his backpack on Nov. 14, his birthday, and shot students at Saugus High School in the Los Angeles suburb of Santa Clarita seemingly at random before turning the gun on himself. The sheriff told KABC it was not yet clear if the teenage gunman put the weapon together himself.


  • Meet What Could be The U.S. Navy's Ultimate Weapon (As in a New Destroyer)

    Meet What Could be The U.S. Navy's Ultimate Weapon (As in a New Destroyer)Navy Flight III Destroyers have a host of defining new technologies not included in current ships.


  • Dozens of dogs tested in French search for woman's forest killers

    Dozens of dogs tested in French search for woman's forest killersFrench police investigating the death of a pregnant woman mauled to death by dogs while walking in the woods have carried out DNA tests on 67 dogs to try identify those that attacked her, investigators said Thursday. Elisa Pilarski, 29, was found dead on Saturday in Retz forest about 90 kilometres (55 miles) northeast of Paris. A hunt with hounds was underway at the time in the forest where she was walking her own dog.


  • Graham demands Biden documents from the State Department

    Graham demands Biden documents from the State DepartmentSouth Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham on Hunter Biden, impeachment hearings on 'Hannity.'


  • Pence Denies Discussing Ukraine Investigations with Sondland or Zelensky

    Pence Denies Discussing Ukraine Investigations with Sondland or ZelenskyVice President Mike Pence denied that Gordon Sondland ever voiced concerns about a potential quid pro quo with Ukraine on Tuesday morning after Sondland claimed otherwise in his Tuesday morning testimony.Sondland, who serves as ambassador to the E.U., testified that he told Pence that he had “concerns that the delay in aid had become tied to the issue of investigations” ahead of a September 1 meeting between Pence and Ukrainian Volodymyr Zelensky.Pence's office issued a statement contradicting Sondland's testimony in response.“The Vice President never had a conversation with Gordon Sondland about investigating the Bidens, Burisma, or the conditional release of financial aid to Ukraine based upon potential investigations,” a statement from Marc Short, Pence’s chief of staff, read. “Ambassador Gordon Sondland was never alone with Vice President Pence on the September 1 trip to Poland. This alleged discussion recalled by Ambassador Sondland never happened.”In his testimony, Sondland recounted a meeting between Pence and Zelensky, in which Zelensky “raised the issue of security assistance directly with Vice President Pence.” Sondland said that Pence told the Ukrainian president that he would ask President Trump about it. In his statement, Short does not deny that the pair discussed military aid, but does say that “multiple witnesses have testified under oath” that no investigations were ever brought up during the September meeting between Pence and Zelensky.“Multiple witnesses have testified under oath that Vice President Pence never raised Hunter Biden, former Vice President Joe Biden, Crowdstrike, Burisma, or investigations in any conversation with Ukrainians or President Zelensky before, during, or after the September 1 meeting in Poland,” Short's statement concludes.Sondland also testified that he pulled top Ukrainian aide Andriy Yermak aside during the September meeting to say that “he believed that the resumption of U.S. aid would likely not occur until Ukraine took some kind of action on the public statement that we had been discussing for many weeks.” He added that he relayed this message at Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's behest.


  • Saudi Arabia’s Oil Heartland Is Calm. That’s Bad News for Iran

    Saudi Arabia’s Oil Heartland Is Calm. That’s Bad News for Iran(Bloomberg) -- At a cultural gathering in the region of Qatif in Saudi Arabia’s oil-rich east, a poet recited some of his work before taking questions. The audience of 80 or so people was engaged and smiling, while a man quietly served coffee and tea in espresso-sized paper cups.The scene of relaxed conviviality on a Monday evening in November might have been anywhere, save for the white thobes worn by the men, the women in mainly black abaya cloaks and the smell of cardamom in the coffee. But the event stood out for where and when it was, rather than what it was.Qatif is an area inhabited mainly by Shiites, who make up roughly 15 percent of the Saudi population and whose branch of Islam is most identified with Iran. The poet was a Sunni, the sect that dominates the kingdom.  The organizers said they had hosted Sunnis before, yet the atmosphere during a tense period for Saudi-Iranian relations showed how much Saudi Arabia has changed over the past three years. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the leader and heir, is trying to fashion a kingdom underpinned by national identity rather than the traditional Wahhabi religious conservatism that defined society for generations. He has sought to crush any dissent against that new narrative.Read More: Where Have All the Wahhabis Gone?As a proxy war rages with Iran, there’s been none of the usual tightening of security around Shiite areas in Eastern Province. Also absent are the verbal attacks by radical Sunni clerics that accompanied previous episodes of tension with Iran.Saudi Shiites interviewed on two days in Qatif, less than an hour’s drive from oil giant Aramco’s headquarters, said anti-Shiite language in religious classes in their area has been toned down, more effort is being made to include a few Shiites in scholarship and training programs and more jobs are open for them.A science teacher who now lives in the adjacent city of Al Khobar said Shiites would pay the price every time there was conflict with Iran. One woman said the difference now is they no longer felt like “the scapegoat.”  These people declined to be identified by name, something that’s common among Saudis of all backgrounds when talking about the new era.There was only one checkpoint outside the city and no sign of security personnel. In the past, there were at least four, manned by the Saudi military, on the way from the city of Dammam to Qatif.“One of the biggest problems for the Saudis has been that the Iranians have made inroads into the Sunni Arab world, and significant ones,” said Kamran Bukhari, founding director of the Center for Global Policy in Washington. “It’s a strategic move by Mohammed bin Salman to say if we alienate our Shiites, then they will go running into the arms of Iran.”Saudi Arabia has led an offensive against Yemeni guerrillas that it says are backed by Iran. The two regional rivals funded forces on either side of the Syrian civil war. Riyadh hasn’t extended the usual financial aid to Lebanon because of concern money would flow to the Iranian-backed militants of Hezbollah.During the 2011 Arab Spring, Saudi security forces were quick to put down an uprising in Shiite-dominated Bahrain in case it spread to Eastern Province. The two territories are connected by bridges and causeways. In the years since then, the Saudi region has been blighted by bouts of unrest, detentions and demonstrations.The Shiites, whose split with the Sunnis goes back to the period following the Prophet Mohammed’s death, have been marginalized in Saudi Arabia and excluded from top jobs in the government and military. Those interviewed earlier this month said that while they’re happy with the changes, they also worry that progress could be reversed at short notice.“The problem is, the remote control is not with us,” one Shiite man who ran his own investment company said over a fish lunch in Qatif. “They have turned down the volume, but they still have the remote control. We don’t know when they will use it.”  That sentiment seems prevalent. “Yes, there’s been an improvement, but it will take time to change the mindset of ordinary Saudis who have been bred on hatred of Shiites,” said a Shiite woman.Saudi Shiites say the atmosphere changed after a three-month campaign in the Shiite-majority town of Awwamiya in Eastern Province in 2017 that leveled dozens of homes and sent thousands fleeing. A year later, the government announced plans for a new downtown area with a cultural center and a gallery in what Saudi-owned Al Arabiya TV said was deploying development to fight terrorism.The government, meanwhile, clipped the wings of the radical Sunni clerics who held sway over religious, social and legal policies and used the most derogatory language to describe Shiites, Jews and Christians. It also introduced a law against hate speech in August 2017 that gave the Department of Public Prosecution the power to charge offenders with spreading hate speech and threatening peace and security.The Wahhabi version of Sunni Islam considers Shiites heretics. Saudi Shiites frequently had to defend themselves against claims they might be a potential fifth column for Iran. “Their enmity to Islam and Muslims has long been known,” Sheikh Saleh al-Fowzan, a member of the Council of Senior Scholars, the kingdom’s highest religious authority, was quoted by Al-Madina newspaper as saying in June 2013. The remark came after Hezbollah said it had joined the fight alongside the Syrian regime against mostly Sunni rebels.In early 2016, a prominent Shiite cleric was beheaded along with dozens of others charged with terrorism offences. He was blamed for inciting unrest in Eastern Province five years earlier. His execution prompted protests in Tehran against the Saudi embassy, which has remained shut since then because diplomatic ties were severed.  There are more recent cases. Human Rights Watch said a mass execution in April included 33 Saudi Shiite men, and that maltreatment under Prince Mohammed has continued.The relative peace now could be an unintended consequence of “Vision 2030,” the crown prince’s blueprint for his transformation of the kingdom, according to another Shiite businessman.The situation is “much better and the atmosphere is more relaxed, but that’s also because Prince Mohammed crushed the dissent and jailed many of the agitators,” Sunnis and Shiites alike, he said. “The religious establishment was one of the main tools against us. We definitely don’t feel under attack anymore.”Indeed, many Shiites in Qatif have bought into the prince’s focus on Saudi identity and the new social freedoms, such as allowing men and women to interact with fewer restrictions, the businessman said. “Our families and most Shiites here feel a religious connection to Iran,” said a Shiite woman. “But whenever there’s trouble, they know it’s only Saudi Arabia that can help us.”To contact the authors of this story: Rodney Jefferson in Edinburgh at r.jefferson@bloomberg.netDonna Abu-Nasr in Riyadh at dabunasr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Paul Sillitoe at psillitoe@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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    Greece Says It’s Close to Saturation Point on Migration Flows(Bloomberg) -- Greece is reaching the point where it can no longer handle on its own the number of immigrants reaching its shores, the migration minister said.While the situation is not yet as bad as the during the crisis of 2015 and 2016, the number of arrivals jumped 240% in the period from May to September this year, George Koumoutsakos said in a written response to questions during a visit to Washington.“If this trend continues, we will then face a very serious situation,” Koumoutsakos said.As a front-line state, the new Greek government is enhancing border controls, building closed centers to hold migrants due to be expelled and trying to establish more effective ways to send people home if their asylum claims are denied.But Athens is also warning its European partners that they will face consequences if Greece’s resources are overwhelmed.“If Greece overflows, there will be secondary flows to other European countries as well,” Koumoutsakos said. Greece wants EU members to open up negotiations on a new system for spreading the burden of handling immigrants.SanctionsThe so-called Dublin agreement currently in place proved inadequate during the crisis and Greece has three priorities for improving the system.A fair distribution of the immigration burden among all EU membersTougher action, including sanctions, to force third countries to accept the return of people denied the right to stay in EuropeA crisis mechanism for when asylum applications exceed a certain threshold in any one countryGreece is also working closely with European partners and the U.S. to tackle situations that could pose security issues, such as the recent case of an American suspected of being an Islamic State militant who was stranded between Turkey and Greece.Turkey has been very persistent in suggesting it could open the doors to Europe for millions of Syrian refugees, Koumoutsakos said.“The constant repetition of these threats is a source of particular concern and certainly a factor of vigilance and alertness not only for Greece, but for Europe as a whole,” he added.To contact the reporters on this story: Paul Tugwell in Athens at ptugwell1@bloomberg.net;Glen Carey in Washington at gcarey8@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sotiris Nikas at snikas@bloomberg.net, ;Bill Faries at wfaries@bloomberg.net, Ben SillsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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